Category Archives: Victoria in North Oxfordshire

MP HOSTS NEXT STOP ON HER ‘NEW RESIDENTS’ ROADSHOW’ IN BANBURY

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Friday 12 January saw Victoria Prentis, Member of Parliament for North Oxfordshire, host her second ‘New Residents’ Roadshow’ at Longford Park, Banbury.

With North Oxfordshire experiencing five times the national average of house building, Victoria was keen to meet those moving into her constituency and discuss any issues they have, particularly on the new developments. The second of her roadshows, hosted at Longford Park Primary School, took place on Friday evening, giving residents the chance to meet their MP and neighbours.

The event was well attended by people from across the development; key topics of conversation included street lighting, road safety, and community facilities. Cherwell District Council’s Community Development Partner, Rosie Phillips, also came along to offer her support.

After the roadshow, Victoria commented: “It was great to meet so many people of varying ages and welcome them to the area. I know there are a number of unresolved issues in Longford Park so it is helpful to chat to residents about their concerns or suggestions.  

I look forward to taking my roadshow back to Bicester in March and then return to a new development in Banbury later on this year.”

 

Safeguarding Children in Banbury Competition

Pupils at schools in Cherwell local police area competed against each other to create a logo for the Safeguarding Children In Banbury Group.

The Safeguarding Children In Banbury Group is made up of primary and secondary schools, Locality and Community Support Service teams, Police and other partner agencies. The groups aim is to get schools to work collaboratively to identify and deliver suitable content on priorities such as child sexual exploitation across all schools at the same time.

The logo entries were judged by local MP Victoria Prentis, Councillor Kieron Mallon and Superintendent Mark Johns at Banbury police station and after much deliberation a winner and two runners up were selected.

Superintendent Mark Johns visited the competition winner, Ysabella Mistula a pupil at Blessed George Napier Catholic School and Sixth Form, to present her with an award.

Congratulations to all who entered the competition.

Victoria judging the competition with Superintendent Mark Johns and Cllr Kieron Mallon.

Victoria judging the competition with Superintendent Mark Johns and Cllr Kieron Mallon.

 

BANBURY MP, VICTORIA PRENTIS, WELCOMES HORTON REFERRAL

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Member of Parliament for North Oxfordshire, Victoria Prentis, has welcomed today the Secretary of State’s decision to refer the permanent downgrade of Banbury’s maternity unit to the Independent Reconfiguration Panel (IRP).

On 10 August 2017, the Oxfordshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) resolved to make permanent the temporary suspension of consultant-led maternity at the Horton General Hospital. As a result, the Joint Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee (JHOSC), chaired by Cllr Arash Fatemian, referred the matter to Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt.

Following on from the outcome of the recent Judicial Review hearing, which found in favour of the CCG, Victoria pressed upon the Department of Health the importance of moving forward, given widespread uncertainty about the future of the unit.

Today, the Secretary of State wrote to Victoria to let her know that he would be passing the matter onto the IRP to undertake an initial assessment before deciding whether it conducts a full review. In his referral, he drew upon the opposition of local councils and their responsibility to scrutinise decisions.

Victoria commented: “I am pleased that the Secretary of State has agreed to pass the decision to the Independent Reconfiguration Panel for consideration. It is with regret that we find ourselves in a similar position to 2008, when the IRP were last asked to look at maternity provision at the Horton General Hospital. The IRP is the independent expert on NHS service change; it takes into account all available evidence in order to advise the Secretary of State on contested proposals. I have no doubt that they will look at this matter properly, and am hopeful that they will agree to undertake a full investigation.”

Cllr Kieron Mallon, a longstanding Banbury Councillor and campaigner for the Horton also commented: “For those of us who were involved in 2008 we think it is right and proper for the Secretary of State to refer this on. We are all hopeful that the Independent Reconfiguration Panel will investigate this fully as they did the previous referral.”

A NEW YEAR MESSAGE FROM VICTORIA PRENTIS MP

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2017 has been marked by its unpredictability. Navigating the uncharted waters of Brexit has dominated national headlines. At Westminster, the final few weeks of the year were spent analysing the EU Withdrawal Bill line-by-line. With 405 amendments and 85 new clauses, it meant a lot of late nights but was an extremely thorough process. I spent as much time as possible in the Chamber, listening to colleagues make often impassioned contributions. My own approach was to try to improve the Bill, particularly as I represent a constituency which voted narrowly to leave. We must respect the result and seek to secure a deal that guarantees a deep and special partnership with the EU.

 

While Brexit may have taken centre stage nationally, our fight to keep acute services at the Horton General Hospital has, quite rightly, been our main focus locally. We remain unhappy about the decision to remove obstetric services at the hospital but the sheer grit and determination of campaigners has been extraordinary. The judicial review may not have been successful, but Mr Justice Mostyn’s judgment only served to reinforce my profound discomfort about the way in which the Clinical Commissioning Group ran the Phase One consultation. The Secretary of State can be in no doubt about how I feel. The Independent Reconfiguration Panel must have the opportunity to conduct an investigation into the downgrade of maternity services.

 

A fully functioning hospital is more important than ever as we build houses at a rate three times the national average. I am not blind to the challenges of such unprecedented growth. My new Residents’ Roadshow has made it very clear that, from potholes to post boxes, a joined up approach between local authorities and developers is essential as we continue to grow. Ensuring both old and new residents feel part of the same community is paramount to the success of our new housing estates. When we work together, we really can achieve results. Nowhere is that more obvious than the Great British Spring Clean, Singing for Syrians and Refill – three campaigns I have been closely involved with in 2017.

 

I am hopeful that these initiatives will grow from strength to strength in the coming year. I accept that 2018 will not be easy as we continue to negotiate our departure from the EU. While I may have to spend the majority of my week at Westminster, my focus will remain on working hard for all those who live in North Oxfordshire. I may not have the solution to every problem but I could not be more committed to ensuring that all my constituents have a prosperous and peaceful New Year.

 

Victoria Prentis MP

1 January 2018

MP RESPONDS TO HORTON JUDICIAL REVIEW JUDGMENT

Following today’s judgment relating to Oxfordshire Clinical Commissioning Group’s Phase One consultation, North Oxfordshire MP Victoria Prentis has issued the following statement:
 
‘I am very familiar with the processes of judicial review, having worked in this area for twenty years, and was pleased to be able to attend Court at the beginning of the month. During the hearing, the CCG were able to produce evidence which we had all been asking for since the consultation process began. It is deeply regrettable that it took legal proceedings for this to be made public, and that it was exactly this hard data that aided the CCG’s defence.
 
While Mr Justice Mostyn found against the four councils and the Keep the Horton General group, I was very interested to read his judgment. He was critical about the CCG’s consultation. Notably, in Paragraph 25 he states: “The conclusions I have reached thus far should not be taken to signify that I personally approve of the decision to split this consultation. It was said that the reason it was done in this way was because of the urgency of the matters covered by phase 1. But they were not urgent.”
 
He goes on to say in Paragraph 26: “I can well see why in the absence of hard data the claimants and the interested party would assert that as a matter of principle decisions made following phase 1 would queer the pitch when the phase 2 consultation came around…It is a mystery to me why that data was not supplied sooner.”
 
The judgment has simply served to reinforce my profound discomfort about the way in which the CCG ran the consultation. I have written to the Secretary of State immediately, urging him to use the powers identified by Mr Justice Mostyn, which enable him to ask the CCG to rerun the consultation.’

OXFORDSHIRE MPS TEAM UP TO RAISE MONEY FOR SYRIA

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On Tuesday 12 December, Oxford West & Abingdon MP, Layla Moran sang in the choir of the 2017 flagship “Singing for Syrians” concert. Over 600 people attended the event at St Margaret’s Church, Westminster Abbey, which was organised by neighbouring MP, Victoria Prentis, and raised money for the Hands Up Foundation who support a number of projects to help the most vulnerable who remain in Syria.

Alongside the choir, which was made up of fourteen Members of Parliament, a number of celebrities read at the concert, including Samuel West, Julie Christie and Martin Jarvis. Alexander Armstrong performed “Winter Wonderland”. The event raised over £32,000 through sponsorship, the retiring collection and ticket donations.  

Victoria Prentis MP said: “I was delighted to recruit Layla to the MP choir. Singing together is a simple yet effective way to raise money for those most in need in Syria. It is really important to me that the choir is cross-party – it shows that we can all work together to help some of the world’s most vulnerable people. They all sang beautifully and showed that the plight of the Syrian people has not been forgotten.”

Layla Moran MP added: “It was a privilege to sing in the choir at such a magical event. In my youth I went to Damascus when my family lived in Jordan. My heart breaks for the people whose lives have been affected by the conflict, and so when Victoria told me about this event I jumped at the chance to do my little bit. I’d like to thank all those in Oxfordshire who held similar events, the Hands Up Foundation for the amazing work they do, and Victoria for putting the event together. I hope to participate again next year!”

NORTH OXFORDSHIRE MP OPENS HEYFORD YOUTH CENTRE

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On Saturday 9 December, Victoria Prentis, Member of Parliament for North Oxfordshire, kicked off Christmas festivities in Heyford Park, opening the community’s new Youth Centre.

Heyford Park Youth Group (now a registered charity) was established in April 2017 by local residents, including Tom Beckett and Dave Beesley. It was felt that the area needed more activities for young people, particularly while it undergoes significant redevelopment. Starting out from a room in the Community Centre, it now occupies a building provided by developers Dorchester Living. The Group will eventually move into its own permanent, purpose-built facility. Activities are currently aimed at 13-18 year olds, but it is hoped that those as young as ten will soon be catered for.

Residents have come together to raise money, donate items and help the group renovate the building.  In addition, Upper Heyford Parish Council has provided funds to refurbish the site and run it for the first year, with additional support available if required in the future.

After the opening, Victoria said: “It was an honour to be invited to open the new youth centre in Heyford Park. With a growing community, it is important that all age groups are provided with the necessary facilities. It’s lovely to see the community spirit that has turned this vision into a reality.”

Tom Beckett, a founder of the Youth Group and resident commented: “Dave Beesley and I are very proud of this project, not just because we are providing a new youth facility, but because the whole community has contributed in some way to get us from our initial vision to a fully funded and furnished youth facility.”

COMMUTERS BEGIN WEEKEND ON HIGH NOTE AT LONDON MARYLEBONE

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On Friday 1 December, commuters returning to their North Oxfordshire homes were surprised by a Hallelujah Chorus flash mob at London Marylebone station. Forty professional singers broke out into song during the evening rush hour in aid of Singing for Syrians, the charity initiative set up in 2015 by Member of Parliament, Victoria Prentis with the Hands Up Foundation.

Conducted by musical director, Nicholas Cleobury, and accompanied by trumpeter, Kevin Kay-Bradley, the choral flash mob followed Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus with carols on the station concourse.

Singing for Syrians is a nationwide campaign which raises money for the Hands Up Foundation who support a number of projects helping the most vulnerable who remain in Syria. They pay the medical salaries of doctors in rural southern Aleppo, run a kindergarten in Idleb and fund two prosthetic limb clinics. It is estimated that over 30,000 Syrians are amputees in need of urgent treatment.

North Oxfordshire MP Victoria Prentis, who was at the station to watch the flash mob unfold, said afterwards: “When the first singer broke into song everyone around her was completely taken aback, particularly as she was dressed in Chiltern Railways uniform. As others joined in across the station, it was an extraordinary sound and sight which really did raise the roof.

“The whole point of Singing for Syrians is to show that we all have the power to do something. By coming together in a positive and uplifting way, and singing at the tops of our voices, we can all make a difference. The flash mob could not have made that clearer. Hopefully people will be inspired to hold their own event or come along to the flagship concert at St Margaret’s Church, Westminster Abbey on Tuesday 12 December. I would encourage everyone to look at www.singingforsyrians.com.

“My thanks to Chiltern Railways, BNP Paribas and Redshift Media Production for making the flash mob possible.”

 

VICTORIA PRENTIS MP ANNOUCES THE WINNER OF HER CHRISTMAS CARD COMPETITION

2017 Christmas card

This autumn, Victoria Prentis MP ran a competition for local schoolchildren to design her Christmas card. It has proved a popular initiative since she was first elected in 2015, and this year’s theme was shepherds.

There were some high quality entries, but the eventual winner was Ethan Osborne from Bure Park Primary School for his silhouette design. The card will now be sent out to the over 250 people on Victoria’s Christmas card list. She visited Ethan at school on Monday 27 November to present him with copies of his cards and some gifts from the House of Commons. He will be visiting the Houses of Parliament early next year with his family.

Victoria commented: ‘I love running my Christmas card competition every year, and we always have some brilliant entries. Ethan’s really stood out for his clever use of the silhouette design. It’s a lovely piece of artwork and the cards look fantastic this year – I am sure everyone on my list will be very impressed!’

Ethan said: ‘I really enjoyed meeting Victoria at school and am looking forward to visiting the Houses of Parliament. I liked designing my card and was very excited that I won. I would recommend everyone to take part next year!’

VICTORIA PRENTIS MP WELCOMES MATERNITY SAFETY STRATEGY

Victoria Prentis MP was in the Commons Chamber on Wednesday 29 November to hear the Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt, announce a new safety strategy for NHS maternity services. New measures include the more effective sharing of best practice, independent investigations into the loss of a baby, and more accessible training for staff.

As Vice-Chair of the APPG on Baby Loss, Victoria takes a keen interest in maternity services. She welcomed the Secretary of State’s announcement and took the opportunity to ask about special training for coroners dealing with baby loss cases.

 

The following account is taken from the Official Report (Hansard) from Wednesday 29 November 2017.

Secretary of State for Health (Jeremy Hunt): With permission, I will make a statement about the Government’s new strategy to improve safety in NHS maternity services.

Giving birth is the most common reason for admission to hospital in England. Thanks to the dedication and skill of NHS maternity teams, the vast majority of the roughly 700,000 babies born each year are delivered safely, with high levels of satisfaction from parents. However, there is still too much avoidable harm and death. Every child lost is a heart-rending tragedy for families that will stay with them for the rest of their lives. It is also deeply traumatic for the NHS staff involved. Stillbirth rates are falling but still lag behind those in many developed countries in Europe. When it comes to injury, brain damage sustained at birth can often last a lifetime, with about two multi-million pound claims settled against the NHS every single week. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists said this year that 76% of the 1,000 cases of birth-related deaths or serious brain injuries that occurred in 2015 might have had a different outcome with different care. So, in 2015, I announced a plan to halve the rate of maternal deaths, neonatal deaths, brain injuries and stillbirths, and last October I set out a detailed strategy to support that ambition.

Since then, local maternity systems have formed across England to work with the users of NHS maternity services to make them safer and more personal; more than 80% of trusts now have a named board-level maternity champion; 136 NHS trusts have received a share of an £8.1 million training fund; we are six months into a year-long training programme and, as of June, more than 12,000 additional staff have been trained; the maternal and neonatal health safety collaborative was launched on 28 February; 44 wave 1 trusts have attended intensive training on quality improvement science and are working on implementing local quality improvement projects with regular visits from a dedicated quality improvement manager; and 25 trusts were successful in their bids for a share of the £250,000 maternity safety innovation fund and have been progressing with their projects to drive improvements in safety.

However, the Government’s ambition is for the health service to give the safest, highest-quality care available anywhere in the world, so there is much more work that needs to be done. Today, I am therefore announcing a series of additional measures. First, we are still not good enough at sharing best practice. When someone flies to New York, their friends do not tell them to make sure that they get a good pilot. But if someone gets cancer, that is exactly what friends say about their doctor. We need to standardise best practice so that every NHS patient can be confident that they are getting the highest standards of care.

When it comes to maternity safety, we are going to try a completely different approach. From next year, every case of a stillbirth, neonatal death, suspected brain injury or maternal death that is notified to the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists’ “Each Baby Counts” programme—that is about 1,000 incidents annually—will be investigated not by the trust at which the incident happened, but independently, with a thorough, learning-focused investigation conducted by the healthcare safety investigation branch. That new body started up this year, drawing on the approach taken to investigations in the airline industry, and it has successfully reduced fatalities with thorough, independent investigations, the lessons of which are rapidly disseminated around the whole system.

The new independent maternity safety investigations will involve families from the outset, and they will have an explicit remit not just to get to the bottom of what happened in an individual instance, but to spread knowledge around the system so that mistakes are not repeated. The first investigations will happen in April next year and they will be rolled out nationally throughout the year, meaning that we will have complied with recommendation 23 of the Kirkup report into Morecambe Bay.

Secondly, following concerns that some neonatal deaths are being wrongly classified as stillbirths, which means that a coroner’s inquest cannot take place, I will work with the Ministry of Justice to look closely into enabling, for the first time, full-term stillbirths to be covered by coronial law, giving due consideration to the impact on the devolved Administration in Wales. I would like to thank my hon. Friend the Member for East Worthing and Shoreham (Tim Loughton) for his campaigning on this issue.

Next, we will to do more to improve the training of maternity staff in best practice. Today, we are launching the Atain e-learning programme for healthcare professionals involved in the care of newborns to improve care for babies, mothers and families. The Atain programme works to reduce avoidable causes of harm that can lead to infants born at term being admitted to a neonatal unit. We will also increase training for consultants on the care of pregnant women with significant health conditions such as cardiovascular disease.

We know that smoking during pregnancy is closely correlated with neonatal harm. Our tobacco control plan commits the Government to reducing the prevalence of smoking in pregnancy from 10.7% to 6% or less by 2022. Today, we will provide new funding to train health practitioners, such as maternity support workers, to deliver evidence-based smoking cessation according to appropriate national standards.

The 1,000 new investigations into “Each Baby Counts” cases will help us to transform what can be a blame culture into the learning culture that is required, but one of the current barriers to learning is litigation. Earlier this year, I consulted on the rapid resolution and redress scheme, which offers families with brain-damaged children better access to support and compensation as an alternative to the court system. My intention is that in incidents of possibly avoidable serious brain injury at birth, successfully establishing the new independent HSIB investigations will be an important step on the road to introducing a full rapid resolution and redress scheme in order to reduce delays in delivering support and compensation for families. Today, I am publishing a summary of responses to the consultation, which reflect strong support for the key aims of the scheme: to improve safety, to improve patients’ experience, and to improve cost-effectiveness. I will look to launch the scheme, ideally, from 2019.

Finally, a word about the costs involved. NHS Resolution spent almost £500 million settling obstetric claims in 2016-17. For every £1 the NHS spends on delivering a baby, another 60p is spent by another part of the NHS on settling claims related to previous births. Trusts that improve their maternity safety are also saving the NHS money, allowing more funding to be made available for frontline care. In order to create a strong financial incentive to improve maternity safety, we will increase by 10% the maternity premium paid by every trust under the clinical negligence scheme for trusts, but we will refund the increase, possibly with an even greater discount, if a trust can demonstrate compliance with 10 criteria identified as best practice on maternity safety.

Taken together, these measures give me confidence that we can bring forward the date by which we achieve a halving of neonatal deaths, maternal deaths, injuries and stillbirths from 2030—the original planned date—to 2025. I am today setting that as the new target date for the “halve it” ambition. Our commitment to reduce the rate by 20% by 2020 remains and, following powerful representations made by voluntary sector organisations, I will also include in that ambition a reduction in the national rate of pre-term births from 8% to 6%. In particular, we need to build on the good evidence that women who have “continuity of carer” throughout their pregnancy are less likely to experience a pre-term delivery, with safer outcomes for themselves and their babies.

I would not be standing here today making this statement were it not for the campaigning of numerous parents who have been through the agony of losing a treasured child. Instead of moving on and trying to draw a line under their tragedy, they have chosen to relive it over and over again. I have often mentioned members of the public such as James Titcombe and Carl Hendrickson, to whom I again pay tribute. But I also want to mention members of this House who have bravely spoken out about their own experiences, including my hon. Friends the Members for Colchester (Will Quince), for Eddisbury (Antoinette Sandbach) and for Banbury (Victoria Prentis), as well as the hon. Members for Lewisham, Deptford (Vicky Foxcroft), for Washington and Sunderland West (Mrs Hodgson) and for North Ayrshire and Arran (Patricia Gibson). Their passionate hope—and ours, as we stand shoulder to shoulder with them—is that drawing attention to what may have gone wrong in their own case will help to ensure that mistakes are not repeated and others are spared the terrible heartache that they and their families endured. We owe it to each and every one of them to make this new strategy work. I commend this statement to the House.

Victoria Prentis (Banbury) (Con): As a bereaved parent, but also as a lawyer who has conducted many inquests, I ask the Secretary of State to consider two points. The first is the fact that not many families will need an inquest to determine what went wrong during the birth of their child. Secondly, will he commit to the training of special coroners, just as we have in military inquests, to ensure that those who deal with these very sad cases are the best equipped people to do so? Finally, on behalf of the all-party group on baby loss, may I thank him for today’s announcement and encourage him in his work to make maternity care kinder, safer and closer to home—and may I encourage him to save Horton General Hospital?

Mr Hunt: First, may I apologise to my hon. Friend, because I should have mentioned her in my statement as someone who has spoken very passionately and movingly on this topic in the House? I will take away her point about specialist coroners, because we are now going to have specialist investigators, which we have never had before. I would make one other point. I hope she does not think I am doing down her former profession, but really when people go to the law, we have failed. If we get this right—if we can be more open, honest and transparent with families earlier on—it will, I hope, mean many fewer legal cases, although I am sure that the lawyers will always find work elsewhere.

 

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